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Humble Gratitude: 20+ Breathtaking Draper Temple Pictures

Out of all of our different categories for LDS Temple art, the Draper Utah Temple has one of the largest selections of pictures. Photographers, as well as artists, have been inspired by this sacred building. We’re so grateful that they choose to share their heart and talent!


Enjoy our most stunning images, as well as some fun facts about what went into the construction and beauty of Utah’s twelfth LDS Temple.


Draper Temple Panoramas 

Sometimes the best LDS Temple pictures are the ones that capture the surrounding landscape or cityscape. Often, these images can become symbolic in the way that they show the temple as a beacon of light to the rest of the world. 


Two of our most prolific temple photographers, Scott Jarvie and Robert A. Boyd, have both captured masterful panoramas of the Draper Utah Temple. We love the unique way that each of them employs a contrast of light and dark in their images.


Panoramic photo of the Draper Utah LDS Temple at night.

Draper Temple - Above the Fray by Scott Jarvie

Panoramic photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple at sunset.

Draper Temple - Sunset Panoramic by Robert A. Boyd

Draper Temple Paintings

Photos aren’t the only way to go. We also have multiple talented painters and digital artists who create breathtaking pictures of the Draper Temple. The first two are hand paintings. 


We love Anne Bradham’s eye for detail. She has a gift for painting realist scenes that illustrate just the right colors and textures. Abigale Palmer, on the other hand, has an approach that is more impressionist. She captures the spirit of the sacred building and the sense of calm that accompanies the beautifully kept grounds. Mandy Jane Williams’ picture isn’t handpainted, but it is hand-arranged. Mandy uses some digital art in combination with pieces of different photographs she’s taken of her subject to create her dreamlike pictures.


Detailed LDS art painting of the Draper Utah Temple.

Draper Temple by Anne Bradham

LDS art painting of the Draper Utah Temple.

Draper Temple by Abigale Palmer

LDS art painting of the Draper Utah Temple in a field.

Draper Utah Temple Holy Ground by Mandy Jane Williams

Draper Temple Pictures by Season

Like most Utah LDS temples, the Draper Temple lends itself well to the distinct seasons that residents of Utah get to enjoy year-round. Were you or your parents married in the Draper Temple? A seasonal image may be the perfect addition to your home as a reminder of that special day.  

Spring

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple and flowerbeds.

Draper Temple - a House of Peace by Robert A. Boyd

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple behind spring tulips.

Draper Temple - Tulips by Scott Jarvie

Summer

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple from a distance.

Draper Temple - Irradiated by Evan Lurker

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple at early sunrise.

Draper Temple - Morning Twilight by scott Jarvie

Photo of Draper Utah LDS photo during a sunny day.

Draper Temple by Lance Bertola

Fall

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple among autumn trees.

Draper Temple - Fall Hill by Scott Jarvie

Photo of Draper Temple LDS Temple on a cloudy day amid fall trees.

Draper Temple - Fall Splendor by Kyle Woodbury

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple amid an autumn fog.

Draper Temple - In the Clouds by Robert A. Boyd

Winter

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple in the snow.

Draper Temple - Before the Snowstorm by Kyle Woodbury

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple with snowy mountains in the background.

Draper Temple - Winter Sky by Robert A. Boyd

Draper Temple Facts

If you've ever casually come across  Draper Temple pictures, or driven past it on the highway, you may have wondered what it was. Maybe you also wondered how it was built.


Like all LDS Temples, it is a house of worship where Church members make special promises with God and to do spiritual work for their ancestors. The Church website can tell you more about the worship itself. Here are a few fun facts about its construction:
  

How big is the Draper Utah Temple?

You can tell from any Draper Utah Temple pictures that it is an immense building. Overall, it covers 58,300 square feet. If you include the grounds and the nearby meeting house, then that number multiplies to a whopping 12 acres. Height-wise, the largest part of the Draper Temple, is 50 feet and 10 inches tall. Tack on the height of the steeple and the Angel Moroni statue, and it triples to 168 feet and 8 inches tall.


As with all LDS Temples, the construction consisted of the finest materials available. They imported Limestone, Temple White Granite, and makore wood from places as far as France, China, and Africa.

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple entrance in the evening.

Draper Temple - Welcome to the Temple by Robert A. Boyd

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple and grounds from above.

Draper Temple - A Corner View by Scott Jarvie

When was the Draper Utah Temple dedicated?

The Draper Utah Temple was dedicated on March 20, 2009, just five years after its announcement. It is interesting to note that a large portion of the dedicatory prayer was a humble plead for young people and families:


“In a time of departure from safe moorings, may youth of the noble birthright carry on in the traditions of their parents and grandparents. They are subjected to the sophistries of Satan. Help such youth to stand firm for truth and righteousness. Open wide to their view the gates of learning, of understanding, of service in Thy kingdom. Bless them with a lengthened view of their eternal possibilities.”

 

“Today when the family unit is under attack and things long held sacred are often ridiculed by the world, we seek Thy help to make us equal to our tasks, that our homes may be havens of peace and happiness.”


These passages explicitly reference the growing influence of the adversary and the need for spiritual havens. The temple is the perfect place to find strength and shelter.


"Today when the family unit is under attack and things long held sacred are often ridiculed by the world, we seek Thy help to make us equal to our tasks, that our homes may be havens of peace and happiness."

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple after rainfall.

Draper Temple - Covenant Path Series by Robert A. Boyd

Photo of Draper Temple with a backdrop of hills.

Draper Temple - Holy Places Series by Robert A. Boyd

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple with ground lights glowing.

Draper Temple - Lights On by Scott Jarvie

This topic alone could make for its own article so we won't go too deep. But as for exterior symbolism, one of the most characteristic features of this temple is the sego lily. It is visible within the masterful art of the colorful glass windows.


This simple symbol is a reference to the city's history. The early Utah pioneers, when faced with starvation, were able to survive by eating sego lily roots. It is no surprise that this plant has also become the Utah State flower. One might also consider it a symbol of the spiritual nourishment we can find in the temple, even when we may feel like faced with our own famines.
  

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple and the circular walkway.

Draper Temple - Chrome Series by Robert A. Boyd

Photo of Draper Utah LDS Temple at sunrise.

Draper Temple - Sunrise by Robert A. Boyd

We have lots of new art coming in - Don't miss out!

And don't worry; we publish art, not spam. In line with many principles of art, we believe good things come in small doses.

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