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As the home of Joseph Smith and his family, the state of New York is the setting for a lot of Latter-day Saint church history. Both the Palmyra Temple and the Manhattan Temple are beautiful and sacred buildings built as places of worship and are often seen as powerful tributes to the sacrifices of the early saints.


Enjoy breathtaking pictures of these two temples professionally done by our LDS artists and photographers.


Palmyra LDS Temple

The Sacred Grove is located in Palmyra, New York. This is where Joseph Smith saw the First Vision where he learned that the missing or corrupted parts of Jesus Christ’s gospel would be brought back to how they were when Christ himself taught them. 


Every Latter-day Saint temple holds a significant place in history, but the construction of the Palmyra New York temple is especially meaningful; it marks the fulfillment of what the young Joseph Smith was told that day. The full restoration of Christ’s gospel has begun and continues to move forward toward the fulfillment of many other scriptural prophecies.

When was the Palmyra Temple Dedicated?

The Palmyra New York Temple was dedicated on April 6, 2000, during the 170th anniversary of the organization of Jesus Christ’s restored church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 


A special passage of that dedicatory prayer reads: 


“Thy work, begun here so humbly and with so few, has now blossomed into a vast family. Thy people are spread over the earth. They speak many languages. Great has been the growth, and greater yet it will become as it moves forward in the nations of the earth. May Thy messengers find doors open and hearts ready to receive the glorious truths of the everlasting gospel.”


The prayer honors the past while also looking toward the future. God has many children and the temple and the sacred work that is done there is a symbol of His desire for all of them to return to Him.

How big is the Palmyra Temple?

The exterior of the Palmyra New York temple alone covers 10,700 square footage. The walls are constructed of Bethel white granite, giving it a clean and picturesque look among the lush landscape of upstate New York. Like most LDS Temples, it is situated on a hill and surrounded by a colorful collection of flowerbeds and neat rows of trees. 

Our Top Palmyra Temple Pictures

We are constantly amazed at the variety that our artists and photographers bring to their LDS art. Even with the same subject and the same location, each of these Palmyra New York Temple pictures speaks a message all its own.   

LDS art photo of the Palmyra New York Temple on a cloudy day.

Patch of blue sky by scott Jarvie

Scott’s title Patch of Blue refers to the small piece of blue sky peeking out from behind the summer clouds. The temple itself is often like that patch of sky; it reminds us that Heaven is there, even when we can’t always see it amid the business and chaos of everyday life.


We love this picture because of its vivid colors. The lush grass, pretty flower beds, and bright temple walls are enough to warm up any home.


LDS art photo of the Palmyra New York Temple and walkway leading up to its doors.

Palmyra Temple - Pathway to the Temple by Scott Jarvie

The Palmyra New York Temple has a unique landscape. The hill doesn’t curve quite as softly as you might see at other LDS temple locations. Instead, it takes more of a sharp, steeper turn. Here, Robert captures that unique feature of grounds in the angle of the sidewalk. It guides the eye over and up toward the temple doors.  


Many times, our pathway to the temple isn’t as smooth or straightforward a hike as we’d like. It might mean overcoming addictions or other personal challenges. There might be some steep climbs or sudden turns. However, the spiritual strength that we gain from entering its doors and making special promises with God is well worth the effort.


LDS art photo of the Palmyra New York Temple from above.

Palmyra Temple - Entrance from High by Scott Jarvie

Scott brings us a completely different view of the Palmyra Temple entrance: from the treetops. The glowing windows are the first thing to draw the eye in this picture. Next is the glistening white tiles of the walkway.


Each of these symbolizes the light and cleanliness that enters our lives as we keep ourselves worthy to enter the temple doors.   

LDS art photo of the Palmyra New York Temple entrance against a pastel sky.

Palmyra Temple - A House of Peace by Robert A Boyd

Robert has an entire collection of gorgeous LDS art in his A House of Peace series, and this photo is no exception.


The pinks, purples, and blues of the sky illustrate a sense of calm and peace The soft, cushiony flower beds are welcoming and beckoning. The overall effect shows the temple for what it is: a house of God.


Like Him, it can bring us healing and clarity.   

LDS art photo of the Palmyra New York Temple surrounded by green grounds and trees during sunrise.

Palmyra Temple - Sunrise by Robert A Boyd

In this photo, Robert still captures the pastel skies, but he takes us a step back. We can see the row of trees encircling the temple grounds.


Robert snapped this picture during the time of sunrise. The glowing clouds in connection with the fresh greenery of the grounds create a relaxing scene of physical and spiritual tranquility.  

LDS art photo of the Palmyra Temple peeking out from behind a wall of autumn trees.

Palmyra Temple - Through the Trees by Robert A Boyd

Many temple pictures in LDS art capture the building from up close. We like this photo because it shows us the Palmyra Temple from even further away, amid a lush autumn forest.


The steeple rises above its surroundings, reminding us that the temple can bring added strength to ourselves and our families even in a crowded and chaotic world.   

LDS art photo of the Palmyra New York Temple against a colorful sunset.

Palmyra Temple - Garden Sunset by Scott Jarvie

This is another photo taken from a unique angle. Again, we see the Palmyra New York Temple in the distance.


Only this time, it is surrounded by the green stretch manicured lawns and standing against the setting sun. LDS artwork of temples typically focuses on the stunning white of most of these sacred buildings, but this photo is full of color.   

Manhattan LDS Temple

The Manhattan New York Temple was built right in the heart of the city about twenty miles from the John F. Kennedy International Airport. As such it was constructed with a unique, modern architecture to match. The sharp angles and smooth surfaces make for some interesting visual shots, as you will soon wee.  

When was the Manhattan Temple Dedicated?

The Manhattan New York Temple was dedicated just four years after the Palmyra New York Temple: June 13, 2004


Like all LDS Temples, the dedicatory prayer contains special promises sometimes unique to the area, its history, and its culture. In this case, the prayer alludes to current events of the time:


“Father, there is so much of evil in the world, of strife, of man's inhumanity to man. We pray that peace may come where there is war, that conciliation may come where there is conflict, that neighborliness and love may replace hatred and enmity.”


LDS Temples are considered the house of the Lord. They are reminders of peace, unity, and healing among God’s children.

“Father, there is so much of evil in the world, of strife, of man's inhumanity to man. We pray that peace may come where there is war, that conciliation may come where there is conflict, that neighborliness and love may replace hatred and enmity.”

How big is the Manhattan Temple?

The Manhattan New York Temple covers a span of 20,030 square footage. The white walls that stand proudly in the crowd of buildings are made of variegated granite. 


Unlike most LDS Temples, the Manhattan New York Temple doesn’t have an entire spread of grass, waterworks, walkways, and flowerbeds at its feet. It rises directly from the pavement, sidewalk, alleyways, and the noise of traffic. In a sense, this brings a whole new beauty to this sacred building. It’s a testament to the truth that even in our busy lives, it is possible to make room for God.

Our Top Manhattan Temple Pictures

Without the usual hilltop or open grounds, the Manhattan temple is unique. It has a sleek, smooth look to it that makes it stand out, not only in the city but also among other LDS temple photos. Enjoy these professional pieces of LDS art honoring a quiet building in a loud city.  


LDS art photo of the Manhattan New York Temple surrounded by city lights.

Manhattan Temple - City Lights by Scott Jarvie

One thing that this temple still has in common with most is the lights. In this photo, we see the entire entryway lit with a warm glow, welcoming all who enter its doors.


It seems to hint at the spiritual light and clarity that often comes from making the temple a regular part of our lives.  

LDS art photo of the Manhattan New York Temple spire.

Manhattan Temple - Spire by Scott Jarvie

They even designed the temple's spire to match the surrounding cityscape. It’s more square and has a darker color.


We like this photo because Scott chose to focus on the angel Moroni, a symbol of the return of Christ’s gospel to the earth. His trump symbolizes the importance of sharing this healing message to a hurting world.  

LDS art photo of the Manhattan New York Temple spire and surrounding cityscape.

Manhattan Temple - Spire in the City by Robert A Boyd

Robert also focuses on the spire in this next piece of LDS art. However, his picture captures more of the surrounding buildings. The angle that Robert chose makes the temple appear to be the tallest building, making the steeple the main focus.


The overall message of these artistic choices is one of hope. Regardless of the changes and challenges happening in the world, God’s work continues to move forward at a powerful and exciting pace.  

LDS art painting of the Manhattan New York Temple against a blue sky.

Manhattan Temple by Anne Bradham

Anne Bradham does not publish photography at all in her LDS art; she is a full-fledged painter.  We love her colorful depictions of temples, including Manhattan. The warm, happy colors she chooses brings a celebratory feel to the street block that she captures. There is something profoundly inspiring about having such a sacred building available to church members and citizens of the largest city in the United States.   

LDS art photo of the Manhattan New York Temple from below.

Manhattan Temple - From Below by Scott Jarvie

Black-and-white LDS art photo of the Manhattan New York Temple from below.

Manhattan Temple - Black and White by Scott Jarvie

Scott created two versions of this image: color and black-and-white. Both guide our gaze directly up toward the Heavens. Such an angle might suggest the overwhelming and exciting height of the city, but it also reminds us that, in the end, where our focus should be. It suggests the reassuring truth that, in the end, God is in control.


Even so, we have a hard time deciding which one of these two styles we like best. Do you have a preference? Or maybe more LDS art that you’d like to see? Feel free to leave it in the comments!


For more LDS temple art, take a gander at our gallery.   

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