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7 Stirring Cardston Temple Pictures: A Spiritual Fortress

Many well-known Latter-day Saint Temples have the appearance of a fairytale castle with their flowering gardens and intricate steeples. But the Cardston Temple has a style all it’s own. As you can see in our Cardston Temple pictures, it is more blocky in shape, and its thick, white walls tower over the surrounding trees, giving off more of an impression of a stronghold.


During this time, when so many of us face daily battles of division, mental illness, and constant distraction, this sacred building provides a deep, spiritual shelter and defense. We can draw strength for ourselves and our families as we continue to make and keep the covenants we have made with God.

How big is the Cardston Alberta Temple?

According to the Church Newsroom, the Cardston Alberta Temple covers 81,700 square footage of ground. The white walls were crafted from granite quarried from British Columbia.  


For the temple's construction, the Church expanded its circle of talent by reaching out to commercial architects and conducting a contest. The Church then contracted the contest winners to design and construct the building. 


The architecture of this Canadian temple was based heavily on what was considered modern architecture of the day. This sacred building was the start of newer designs for the LDS temples that were to follow.


Not only was this Canadian temple the first to be designed with more modern styles of the day, but it was also the first to be built outside of the United States. If you have looked at other historical LDS temple pictures, you might notice that they all have steeples. This Alberta temple was the first to be designed without them. 


For that reason, the Cardston Alberta Temple has since been designated a National Historic site. It left its mark with its advanced construction and its importance in the Latter-day Saint religion.   

When was the Cardston Alberta Temple Dedicated?

The Cardston Temple was first dedicated on August 26, 1923. The president of the Church at that time, Heber J. Grant gave the dedicatory prayer. Two fascinating and inspiring passages from that prayer read:


“We beseech Thee, O God in Heaven, that the people of Canada may ever seek Thee for guidance and direction, that Thy declaration that the American continent is a land choice above all other lands, and Thy promise that it shall be protected against all foes, provided the people serve Thee, may be fulfilled, and that the people may grow in power, and strength and dominion, and, above all, in a love of Thy truth.”


“We thank Thee, O Father in Heaven, for the splendid treatment that has been accorded by the officials in the Dominion of Canada to those of Thy people who have immigrated to this country, and we humbly pray Thee to aid Thy sons and Thy daughters who have taken upon them Thy name so to order their lives in righteousness and truth that they may retain the goodwill of the people of this country and merit the same because of their good works.”


The Cardston Temple dedicatory prayer shows just how aware God is of his saints in Canada. After all, it was their efforts and faith that made the construction and dedication possible. The prayer cites the scriptural promise of safety to people who choose to obey and serve God and speaks highly of the local government officials. 

Professional Cardston Temple Pictures

#1 - Simon Dewey

LDS art painting of the Cardston Temple standing above the trees.

Cardston Temple by Simon Dewey

Simon created our first ever painting of the sacred Canadian temple. Like a fortress of defense, it rises above the trees. It stands just as bold and as strong as the distant mountains. 


All LDS Temples are spiritual havens where we can find direction and peace. However, the design of the Cardston temple is a reminder that it is also a place where we can find strength and resolve to face the modern challenges of our day.


#2 - Mountain View

LDS art photo of the Cardston Temple glowing against an evening sky.

Cardston Temple - Mountain View by Hank deLespinasse

Hank’s Cardston Temple picture is similar to Simon’s painting in that it depicts the temple as a solid and sturdy force. It too rises above its surroundings, boldly declaring that the Savior’s love for us never changes, regardless of today’s fast-paced and distracting challenges.


However, in Hank’s piece of LDS art, the temple is glowing with a light that contrasts the surrounding darkness. We also love this photo for the symmetry Hank has created. The temple itself and the mountains in the backdrop line up in a way that the mountains appear to be a shadow.


#3 - Chief Mountain Panorama

Panoramic Cardston Alberta Temple against an evening sky.

Cardston Temple - Chief Mountain Panorama by Hank deLespinass

This second Cardston Temple picture by Hank is a more wide, slightly more angled shot of the first. Here we see more of the mountain scape and surrounding Alberta trees. We love the pinks and purples of the sunset. With the contrasting light of the temple and silhouettes of the trees, it is a stunning panorama. 


We love these panoramic pieces because they add variety to a home or office space. They are perfect for placing over a sofa, adding color to a long hallway, or creating a calming bedroom environment.


#4 - Covenant Path Series

LDS art photo of the Cardston Temple taken after a recent rainfall.

Cardston Temple - Covenant Path Series by Robert A Boyd

Each photo in Robert A. Boyd’s Covenant Path Series of LDS art carries a sense of peace and reflection, and the Cardston Temple picture is no exception. Each photo in the series captures Latter-day Saint temples just after rainfall. We see not only the building itself but also its reflection in the smooth pavement. 


The clearing sky, soft light, and reflection seem to paint the picture of what it feels like to get direction from Heaven. Suddenly, we can see far enough to take another step. The darkness in our minds becomes less dim, and we see ourselves more clearly through an eternal lens.

#5 - Gate Panoramic

LDS art panoramic photo of the Cardston Temple focused on the green entrance gates.

Cardston Temple - Gate Panoramic by Robert A Boyd

Robert’s second Cardston Temple picture is another panoramic view but at a more up-close angle. His focus here is the building's entrance. We appreciate this view because it focuses on the details, such as the green gate. It is a unique feature of this temple and is not otherwise noticeable from afar. 


Robert also catches the stone pillars' symmetry as part of the architecture. They illustrate the sense of security and stability that we often find when we do our best to make temple attendance a regular part of our lives. 

We love these panoramic pieces because they add variety to a home or office space. They are perfect for placing over a sofa, adding color to a long hallway, or creating a calming bedroom environment.

#6 - Purple Storm

LDS art photo of the Cardston Alberta Canada Temple beneath a sky of purple clouds.

Cardston Temple - Purple Storm by Scott Jarvie

Scott takes us a step back down the hill where we see more of the sky than the actual temple. The deep purple of the clouds speaks to Scott’s unique style in his LDS temple pictures. His focus is most often on color, making for some vibrant and memorable photographs. 


In this Cardston Temple picture, there is a nice contrast between the white of the granite walls and the darkening shades of the sky. In a way, this piece of LDS art is also symbolic. Regardless of what storms are brewing in the world, whether personal or societal, we can always find peace and spiritual safety within the walls of the temple.

#7 - Fall Leaves

Cardston LDS Temple framed by autumn leaves.

Cardston Temple - Fall Leaves by Hank deLespinasse

In this last Cardston Temple picture, Hank takes a different angle altogether from the other LDS art pieces we’ve included here. Now we see a picture of the Cardston Alberta temple framed by the oranges, yellows, and reds of autumn leaves. The sky beyond is a clear blue, and the temple itself seems to beckon us to its doors. 


We love this piece for the warm, welcoming light it sheds on this modern and fortress-like building of worship. It is a reminder to all of us that, even in the chilly autumn seasons of our lives, God wants us to draw near to Him. He welcomes us and the progress we are willing to make to live with Him again in the eternities, just as our sacred temple covenants promise.

What is your favorite thing about the Cardston Temple? Do you have any favorite Cardston Temple pictures? We would love to hear!   

We have lots of new art coming in - Don't miss out!

And don't worry; we publish art, not spam. In line with many principles of art, we believe good things come in small doses.

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